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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this method isn't for everyone, but if you are looking for a good durable windshield that doesn't cost an arm and a leg, this might be an option.

1. You will need a Lexan of your choice. I went with a version that has UV protection on both sides.

2. Self adhesive weather stripping. I went with a 1" foam.

3. Zip ties.

Tools: something to cut the Lexan (unless you have it precut). I used a Dremel sawmax. Plus a drill to make the mounting holes.

Estimated project time: under 30 minutes.



I was able to pick up a 36"x48" sheet for $75 from a hardware store.



I measured the space available. 48" was perfect for the width and 30" for height. I snapped a line on the Lexan and used my sawmax with a multi purpose blade. (If you don't work with This material a lot, I suggest setting it on cardboard to cut. That way any extra blade depth isn't hitting your work table and it allows you to cut on a flat surface so the sheet doesn't bend.



I took the cut to size sheet and peeled back the protective film enough that I could apply the weather stripping to the edges on the back sides. I then drilled my mounting holes.



The next step is mounting to the machine. A second pair of hands here would make it a simpler process, it can be done with one person, but you can't be unwilling to have some zip ties in your mouth :)



After it's secure, peel off the film and your ready for the trails.



A photo looking through the new windshield.



Shot to compare looking through the Lexan compared to looking through nothing.

My total cost on this project was $75. As I had everything on hand but the sheet. The windshield is quick to detach and it only takes 6 zip ties to put it back on. So if you remove your roof and windshield to haul the Pioneer, it's a quick off and on process.
 

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Looks good Moose, and you saved a pile over the OEM unit.
Money left over for ...........?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Looks good Moose, and you saved a pile over the OEM unit.
Money left over for ...........?
A good portion of my heater maybe. Or some ammo reloading supplies. Both things I need or want for the winter. :)
 

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Thanks for the tip! You just saved me some cash... I'm going to get the "Honda" half windshield since it contours the body just right and then I'm stealing your idea for the other half. I won't use a full windshield all of the time, thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the tip! You just saved me some cash... I'm going to get the "Honda" half windshield since it contours the body just right and then I'm stealing your idea for the other half. I won't use a full windshield all of the time, thanks again!
I'm here to help. Any other questions, feel free to ask or message.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
did you find that cutting with a dremel like that melted the lexan? how did the edges finish off?
I tried to catch the edges in some pics.



Sawmax cut edge. The protective film is still on it, that's some of the flakiness you see.



Factory edge

No, it didn't melt it. You have to mindful of that though. You want the proper blade, set your depth, keep a steady pace, and use a sacrificial base to cut on that won't add heat to the blade a great deal(Cardboard in this case heats the blade minimally by adding little stress or friction). This is just my method. I have worked with acrylic and poly sheets quite a bit. There are other ways to cut it. I did a quick search and supplied a link below.

As they suggest in the link, you can use sand paper to smooth the edge. I didn't do that, since the one edge I cut was up under the roof.

Any other questions, feel free to ask.:)

How to Cut Lexan | eHow
 
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VERY nice. Not a bad way to spend $75, at least people know there is a good cheap option if you're willing to put in the work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
VERY nice. Not a bad way to spend $75, at least people know there is a good cheap option if you're willing to put in the work.
Yeah, and the stuff is tough. 250 times stronger than glass, well that's what they say, but I don't doubt it. If you need to remove it, it stores flat, or bent, it's much more forgiving than the rigid windows. God forbid you flip up a log and it hits your windshield, it's cheap to replace if it gets marred up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
What kind of wind leak do u get around it? Any? Looks awesome!
I have had it up to around 20mph since I put it on. I haven't noticed any wind. The foam weatherstripping worked well, sealed down tight. Haven't had any rattles or squeaks either. I cinched those zip ties well though. I'll be sure to report if any issues arise.
 

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I tried to catch the edges in some pics.



Sawmax cut edge. The protective film is still on it, that's some of the flakiness you see.



Factory edge

No, it didn't melt it. You have to mindful of that though. You want the proper blade, set your depth, keep a steady pace, and use a sacrificial base to cut on that won't add heat to the blade a great deal(Cardboard in this case heats the blade minimally by adding little stress or friction). This is just my method. I have worked with acrylic and poly sheets quite a bit. There are other ways to cut it. I did a quick search and supplied a link below.

As they suggest in the link, you can use sand paper to smooth the edge. I didn't do that, since the one edge I cut was up under the roof.

Any other questions, feel free to ask.:)

How to Cut Lexan | eHow
Thanks for the info
I've tried to cut plexi before it melted with a dremel

I'll keep in mind the blade you used and try again. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the info
I've tried to cut plexi before it melted with a dremel

I'll keep in mind the blade you used and try again. Thanks!
Yeah, plexiglass has a working temp of up to around 180 degrees for a limited time. Lexan is 275 degrees all day. Also plexiglass will burn on its own if you remove the ignition source, whereas Lexan won't .

Plexiglass is not as forgiving to mistakes either, it's only about 15-20 times stronger than glass vs Lexan at 250 times.

I used to make custom display cases for sports memorabilia, collectible action figures and speaker enclosures in my free time as a side business. You learn fast from your mistakes, because those sheets aren't cheap. :)

So if you swap over to Lexan, you will find it a lot more forgiving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
And welcome to the forum bk1!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Awesome!! I bought that same piece today but wasn't sure how to mount it . Thank you sir
Great minds think alike I guess! Just seemed like the best thickness for the job. It will contour, but isn't too flimsy.

Have any other mods in mind ?
 

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Yeah!! But I was trying to make mounting way more difficult , saved me a lot of aggravation. I have some doors in mind. Will post when done . Hopefully Saturday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yeah!! But I was trying to make mounting way more difficult , saved me a lot of aggravation. I have some doors in mind. Will post when done . Hopefully Saturday.
Sounds good. I have been kicking around a couple ideas as well. Look forward to seeing what you rig up.
 
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