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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
DG Rider has been thinking about doing some sound deadening to his Pioneer. I decided to do some testing for him on this subject.

I did some general durability testing of a couple options for sound deadening on the Pioneer.

I compared 3M undercoating 08881 (black) against Plasti Dip (gunmetal grey)

Each were tested on plastic. Each was only applied in 1 coat. Each was allowed to dry for 4 hours.

The undercoating went on very nicely in an easy to achieve thick coat. The coat was a lot thicker than the Plast Dip. If I was only going to do one coat of something. It would be the undercoating. It looked a lot better than the single coat of Plast Dip.

3M



Plasti Dip



My abrasion testing was, from left to right. A metal fork slid across the surface with just it's own weight. A pretty jagged rock drug across the surface with a moderate pressure. Tapping the surface with the nose of a 40 cal bullet very aggressively 10 times, and finally, a piece of wood dowel about the size of a finger, jammed into the surface and drug across.

3M



Plasti Dip



My conclusions are that the undercoating was more durable in each test, but the wooden dowel.

In my opinion , the undercoating was still a little wet, and with its textured surface, the wood was able to grip it. I don't expect that would happen when dry.

DG Rider asked a question about if undercoating was able to stick well to plastic, so I did a second test on the undercoating alone.

I coated this hard plastic lid for testing.



I put it in a plastic bag with some 40 cal bullets and a a few coarse and sharp rocks. I then held the cap firm in my hand and shook the bag vigorously so that the items inside would be forced against the undercoated surface. To simulate a rock or heavy debris flung up by a tire.



I did two rounds in the bag of 30 seconds each. This is what the cap looked like in the end.



My conclusion is, that undercoating would be the best choice. I think the textured nature and thickness of coats would be far superior in sound deadening and general resistance to damage.
 

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Well....props to you for going the extra mile and giving vital information to me. I owe you...

I had actually purchased some Permatex heavy duty undercoating @ O'reilys just hours ago due to good ratings on Amazon ( with mentions of plastic use ), and was coming to report. Surprisingly, it was cheaper than Amazon at $4.99 a can.

Since this thread has the more appropriate title and info, i am going to run with it here...

Phase one: I replaced the rear diff fluid with Castrol Syntrax 75-90 Synthetic gear lube.
A quick test drive around the yard, and it does seem that the diff is quieter than before, though i am hesitant to proclaim this due to objective testing difficulties.
The one thing in favor of a "yes" result is the fact that the rear foot wells and airbox cover were not on the machine, so it should have been louder. I think considering that fact, we have made progress here, but more testing will tell...

Phase two: In progress...
As i said, i removed the rear footwells and airbox cover to prep for undercoating with a nice washing in the bath-tub. Tomorrow i will mask and spray. I will post pics if they don't embarrass me too much.

Surprising find: The footwells have a wrinkle type finish on the front underneath area closest to the engine. Was this Honda's attempt to do some sound deadening from the factory?

More tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just a little update to my test. 12 hours later, the undercoating is much harder. I'd say after 24 hours you'd be hard pressed to see that tear with a blunt force trauma poke.
 

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Finally got a chance spray the panels this afternoon...







You can see why i don't do paint work!!

I thought i was giving a thin coat until i used up one can on the first panel. Used the second on the rest, concentrating on the areas nearest the engine. Should be dry tomorrow in time to install after work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. That being said. Don't worry no one will ever know. :)
 

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Re-installed tonight and took a quick test spin...

Again, the rear end seems quieter, but if it is, it's is not a huge improvement.

As for the floorboards...i could honestly tell no difference. I can't imagine the coating doesn't help stop some noise, so it is probably the lack of controlled testing that fails to reveal any difference. Maybe when the seats are up, this will be more obvious.

I said before that it seemed like a lot of noise came through the bed area, but tonight it seemed more like it was coming through the gaps in the seat area and associated trim, so maybe that shows the coating did something.

Next plans: Something ( maybe rubber mat type material ) to cover the areas where the seat pegs and buckles are ( holes directly open to the engine ). I plan to simply let this lay and be held by the seat and buckles, and be easily removed when servicing.
I also have just enough heat insulation left over from Moose ( the company, not the member ) to cover an open area directly above the diff and under the dump bed.

Reports soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I like the idea of the mat under seat. I can see gains being had from that.
 

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Now were getting somewhere!

Phrase Three Test Run:

A few weeks ago i bought a $12 dollar SUV cargo mat from Walmart for our oldest dog Missy to stand on when out ( no slipping ). It will likely be a few weeks before we take her out again, so Tonight it gave itself to science.

This was a pretty thin piece of rubber. Actually, I'm not sure if it was really rubber or not, but it wasn't very tear resistant. While checking oil and prepping for going out tomorrow, i decided to make an impromptu mat for the seat area and extend it back to just short of the resting pad for the dump bed.

The passenger side has to be cut shorter due to the air intake, so i cut a little flap to tuck between the intake tube and frame and left it at that. Holes for seat buckles, posts, etc. Remember that air is being sucked in just behind the passenger, so please don't wrap the intake in rubber matting.

This definitely cuts sound...even at idle. The droning from the engine bay at mid RPM's is also muted noticeably...and this is the sound that really annoys me when i put the top on, so i have high hopes for this.

Eventually, i will make a nicer, thicker version, but for now, I'm going riding...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Science!

Best to you on the trail tomorrow DG.
 

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the bedliner/ undercoating isn't going to muffle much im looking into the mat we used to use in our comp sound trucks to prevent rattling panels in a truck. its a lil pricey if I remember correctly but that was covering everysingle inch of metal on the inside of a s10 ext cab or suburban usually 10$ at 1 ft by 3 ft. its self adhesive foam rubber. figure some spray adhesive and then stick it on in sections.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Something like a Dynamat, Skorp?
 

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Phrase Three Test Run:

A few weeks ago i bought a $12 dollar SUV cargo mat from Walmart for our oldest dog Missy to stand on when out ( no slipping ). It will likely be a few weeks before we take her out again, so Tonight it gave itself to science.

This was a pretty thin piece of rubber. Actually, I'm not sure if it was really rubber or not, but it wasn't very tear resistant. While checking oil and prepping for going out tomorrow, i decided to make an impromptu mat for the seat area and extend it back to just short of the resting pad for the dump bed.

The passenger side has to be cut shorter due to the air intake, so i cut a little flap to tuck between the intake tube and frame and left it at that. Holes for seat buckles, posts, etc. Remember that air is being sucked in just behind the passenger, so please don't wrap the intake in rubber matting.

This definitely cuts sound...even at idle. The droning from the engine bay at mid RPM's is also muted noticeably...and this is the sound that really annoys me when i put the top on, so i have high hopes for this.

Eventually, i will make a nicer, thicker version, but for now, I'm going riding...
DG Rider Do you have any pics of what you did. I'm not sure I'm following you. But that is the noise I would like to reduce as well. Thanks, Dale
 

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DG Rider Do you have any pics of what you did. I'm not sure I'm following you. But that is the noise I would like to reduce as well. Thanks, Dale
I don't. Pretty ugly, to be honest.

Imagine removing your seat and laying a rubber mat under it and re-installing the seat, and that's pretty much what i did...simply cutting the appripiate holes for the buckles, etc. On the drivers side i ran it back to just behind the backrest, that passenger side has to stop at the air intake tube.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
that's the name for some reason I couldn't think of it. the foam really soaks up the sound and takes out fluctuation noises also
Yeah. I have used a ton of it. Amazing results can be found. Great for high end audio systems. We used to use it in car builds as well. If your putting together just a sweet classic car, jacked up 4x4, or even a sport bike. Its a great way to make the exhaust note what's noticed, not all the vibrations of 600hp.
 

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the full cab shouldn't have much noise but iv noticed from riding in the back seat that most of the engine noise comes through the bed if that helps
 

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also if you have squeaks on the hard doors or soft doors on the rubber I use wd-40 on my seals on my jeep
 
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