Honda Pioneer Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I cross the occasional stream and river so I wanted to make sure all my electrical connections were waterproof. The process consists of applying "Dielectric Grease" to the inside of all the electrical connections and spark plug cap.

Dielectric Grease:
Maximizes spark and fire power.
Prevents voltage loss and arcing.
Protects from moisture, salt, dirt and corrosion.

Some of the connections are easy to get at and some not so easy, long arms and patience will help. Some connections are up high under the hood and shouldn't be an issue for most people unless you plan on going swimming. There are 2 connections right in front of the right rear tire that will live in the wet and mud no matter how you drive. These are the quick disconnect for the engine, I would recommend everyone waterproof at least these 2, I found evidence of water in these on mine already. The illustrations below will focus on these 2 connections to give you an idea of what is involved. The rest of the connectors will follow the same procedure.



The first thing you will need is a tube of dielectic grease. It can be purchased at your favorite automotive store and costs about $5. Do not substitute for any other kind of grease it must be dielectric! One tube is enough to do the whole machine.



These are connectors we will focus on, they are in front of the right rear tire.



Some of the connectors are attached to holders on the frame. I found it easier to remove them from the holder first. This is done by squeezing the 2 wings together. You do not need to force them if you are doing it right they will pop right out.



Now you need to separate the connectors. This is done by squeezing with your thumb where the arrow is pointing (this releases the lock) then while squeezing hold both ends of the connector and gently pull and wiggle. You do not need a lot of force if your squeezing hard enough to release the lock. Excessive force could break the lock.



Now with the connector open apply grease to the connection. The female side you can hold the end of the tube against it and squeeze grease into the holes. On the male side be careful not stick anything down in and bend any of the male connectors. I found that applying a strip around the inside of the end then pushing connector together worked best. It pushes down in and the excess will squeeze out. Now wipe off or leave excess your choice. Place back into holder and your done. There are also a few motor connection that are accessible from under the drivers seat with long arms.



I also did under the winch connectors. Pull the boots off apply grease to the bolts and in the cap. This is great stuff will keep it shinny and new looking.

If anyone has anything to add feel free to chime in.

P.S. don't forget to do your trailer light connection.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,395 Posts
Nice write up Dick.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys, hopefully it will be a little helpful to someone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
658 Posts
oh they also sell it in a can with a squeeze hanle I use it on my trailer light plugs and light bulbs on my jeep
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
oh they also sell it in a can with a squeeze hanle I use it on my trailer light plugs and light bulbs on my jeep
I've looked at the cans before Skorp but always figured they probably thinned it down in order to use aerosol. Is it the same consistency as the tubes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
658 Posts
exact same all the way to the end. I bought 2 cans so far im about midways through the 2nd can and I live in Louisiana it stays in my trailer tool box year round iv had this can so long the paper isn't even on it anymore. cans rusted and all. I believe its a cnf product from autozone
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top